link round up 14

It’s been a slow news week, but here are the interesting things happening anyway.

ONE; Supergirl is offically moving to the CW, which is good news if you like crossovers and not bad news at all, since Calista Flockhart signed on to move to the CW as well (thank god). Tumblr user delaexmachina wrote an amazing post about how this move is actually very interesting from a television studies perspective, since we now live in “the new age of television where live view ratings are no longer king.”

TWO; White Men Don’t Own Geek Culture is a really important article quickly giving white cis men a crash course in phrases like “appropriation” and how women, especially women of colour, could in no way appropriate “nerd culture.”  argues this really well, with a quick, cutting style, and I loved it.

How could I be “appropriating” when I was just trying to exist in the culture I loved? I don’t have the power to steal nerd culture from cis white men, but they have the power to chase me away—and they also have the power to shape and maintain nerdy movies, books, and TV so that people like me are marginalized or invisible.

THREE; this article, about “Halal in the Family,” a series of comedic Web shorts that came out last year, is fascinating. Not only because it celebrates genius comedy, but it also discusses how to create a show for minorities by minorities. Even minorities need to consult each other, look at their own prejudices etc. to create a show that’s amusing for everyone.

Mandvi co-created the “Halal in the Family” Web series with Miles Kahn, who was the co-creator of the sketch on “The Daily Show.” “In order to get an idea of what we wanted to talk about, we reached out to Muslim advocates and various Muslim organizations and legal organizations that are dealing with this kind stuff in courts: infiltration of mosques, illegal surveillance, cyberbullying,” Mandvi told me. “And we used those as issues to wrap this sitcom format around.” They made the shorts on a shoestring budget, intending to make more in the future. “We launched it on Funny or Die, and it became incredibly popular,” Mandvi said. “It was crazy. Everybody was suddenly talking about it. It made me realize, Oh, there’s a real appetite for this kind of content.”

FOUR; i love it when serious websites need to write “historical” articles about how women really were gamers in the old days! Crazy! Women did things! They were written out of history! Weird! I wonder how that happened? Well, we’ll never know…

Nothing else has happened on my radar, except that I made a fic rec list for Supergirl but that was it. Do you guys have anything to add?